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Anti-Germicidal Light

Salmonella Is Killed By SAFE Blue Light

Salmonella Peanut Butter Call Back Could Cost $125 Million.

The facts are Blue Light in a specific SAFE wavelength kills Salmonella and Listeria. It has been written that the Salmonella Peanut Butter Call Back could cost the company $125 Million dollars. Did you know that there is now a SAFE LED Blue light that when used in food processing industries could cut down on the Salmonella and Listeria problems in the food industry. The question is why they are not taking advantage of the years and years of research from leading professors at some of the top schools in the country Harvard, Wisconsin, San Diego State that says Blue Light can deactivate Listeria and Salmonella. They have proved many times over that Blue Light from 405nm to 470nm kills both Salmonella and Listeria.

Should All Food Processing Plants Use SAFE Blue Light To Kill Salmonella and Listeria?

Don’t Take My Word For It! This is from an article in the Scientific World Journal.

Bactericidal Effects of 405 nm Light Exposure Demonstrated by Inactivation of Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria, and Mycobacterium Species in Liquid Suspensions and on Exposed Surfaces

Despite enormous investments in public health research, bacterial pathogens transmitted in food, water, and from other environmental sources remain a major cause of illness in both the developed and developing world. Examples of such ubiquitous pathogens include enteric Gram-negative bacteria such as Salmonella, Escherichia, and Shigella which continue to cause significant diarrhea infections worldwide [1]. The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes also, has significant impact on health statistics through its propensity for causing serious illness in the immunocompromised [2]. Actinobacteria from the Mycobacterium genus are also a major cause of human morbidity and mortality and pathogens from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as M. bovis and M. tuberculosis remain amongst the most serious causes of infective disease worldwide [3].

Simple Food Grade Blue Light like this around the plant could help keep their products from getting Salmonella and Listeria on top of that it will help keep their employees healthy because the Blue Light also kills a wide range of other bacteria and viruses including MRSA, Staff, Strep, COVID, Colds and Viruses and more.

The question begs Why Wouldn’t You Even Try It?

For More Information On Our line of Bacteria and Virus killing lights please give us a call.

407-230-9096 / 513-325-1623 / 513-702-3533

More information on the research and other articles the confirm that Salmonella and Listeria can be deactivated by simple BLUE LIGHT

Blue 470 nm light suppresses the growth of Salmonella enterica and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro

Violet V Bumah 1Daniela S Masson-Meyers 1Chukuka S Enwemeka 1 2

Affiliations expand

  • PMID: 26174877

 

Abstract

Background and objective: Emerging evidence suggests that blue light can photo-inactivate some bacteria of clinical importance. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis that 470 nm light can suppress growth of two recalcitrant bacteria, MRSA and Salmonella.

Materials and methods: We plated 5 × 106 and 7 × 106 CFU/ml USA300 strain of MRSA and 1 × 106 CFU/ml of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg. Plates were irradiated with 55, 110, 165 and 220 J/cm2 of blue light, incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and colony counts determined.

Results: Compared with controls, blue light irradiation produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in the number of colonies formed by each bacterial strain (P < 0.001). Irradiation of 5 × 106 and 7 × 106 CFU/ml MRSA with 55 J/cm2 produced 92% (4.6 × 106 CFU/ml) and 86% (6 × 106 CFU/ml) inactivation respectively, while 110 and 220 J/cm2 suppressed each MRSA density 100%. Irradiation of Salmonella Typhimurium with 55 and 110 J/cm2 suppressed bacterial growth 31% (3.1 × 105 CFU/ml) and 93% (9.3 × 105 CFU/ml) respectively; while Salmonella Heidelberg was inhibited 11% (1.1 × 105 CFU/ml) and 84% (8.4 × 105 CFU/ml) respectively by the two fluences. Complete inactivation of each Salmonella strain was achieved using 165 or 220 J/cm2 .

Conclusion: The observed inhibition of Gram-positive (MRSA) and Gram-negative (Salmonella) bacteria suggests the versatility of blue light in bacteria eradication, making it a viable intervention strategy for decontamination of food and environments that harbor such bacteria. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:595-601, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Keywords: Salmonella enterica Heidelberg; Salmonella enterica Typhimurium; bacterial suppression; blue light; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; phototherapy.

© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Bumah VV, Masson-Meyers DS, Cashin S, Enwemeka CS.Lasers Surg Med. 2015 Mar;47(3):266-72. doi: 10.1002/lsm.22327. Epub 2015 Jan 12.PMID: 25639752 Free PMC article.

Bumah VV, Masson-Meyers DS, Cashin SE, Enwemeka CS.Photomed Laser Surg. 2013 Nov;31(11):547-53. doi: 10.1089/pho.2012.3461. Epub 2013 Apr 27.PMID: 23621894

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Cited by 9 articles

Enwemeka CS, Bumah VV, Castel JC, Suess SL.J Photochem Photobiol B. 2022 Feb;227:112378. doi: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2021.112378. Epub 2021 Dec 28.PMID: 35085988 Free PMC article.

Terrosi C, Anichini G, Docquier JD, Gori Savellini G, Gandolfo C, Pavone FS, Cusi MG.Pathogens. 2021 Dec 8;10(12):1590. doi: 10.3390/pathogens10121590.PMID: 34959545 Free PMC article.

Enwemeka CS, Bumah VV, Mokili JL.J Photochem Photobiol B. 2021 Sep;222:112282. doi: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2021.112282. Epub 2021 Aug 8.PMID: 34404018 Free PMC article.

Enwemeka CS, Bumah VV, Masson-Meyers DS.J Photochem Photobiol B. 2020 Jun;207:111891. doi: 10.1016/j.jphotobiol.2020.111891. Epub 2020 May 1.PMID: 32388486 Free PMC article.

Van Oijen GW, Croughs PD, Hagenaars T, Verhofstad MHJ, Van Lieshout EMM.J Bone Jt Infect. 2019 Sep 18;4(5):216-222. doi: 10.7150/jbji.35629. eCollection 2019.PMID: 31700769 Free PMC article.

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Related information

 

Blue 470 nm light suppresses the growth of Salmonella enterica and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro.

Lasers Surg Med. 2015 Sep; 47(7):595-601.LS

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Emerging evidence suggests that blue light can photo-inactivate some bacteria of clinical importance. Consequently, we tested the hypothesis that 470 nm light can suppress growth of two recalcitrant bacteria, MRSA and Salmonella.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We plated 5 × 106 and 7 × 106 CFU/ml USA300 strain of MRSA and 1 × 106 CFU/ml of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Heidelberg. Plates were irradiated with 55, 110, 165 and 220 J/cm2 of blue light, incubated at 37°C for 24 hours and colony counts determined.

RESULTS

Compared with controls, blue light irradiation produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in the number of colonies formed by each bacterial strain (P < 0.001). Irradiation of 5 × 106 and 7 × 106 CFU/ml MRSA with 55 J/cm2 produced 92% (4.6 × 106 CFU/ml) and 86% (6 × 106 CFU/ml) inactivation respectively, while 110 and 220 J/cm2 suppressed each MRSA density 100%. Irradiation of Salmonella Typhimurium with 55 and 110 J/cm2 suppressed bacterial growth 31% (3.1 × 105 CFU/ml) and 93% (9.3 × 105 CFU/ml) respectively; while Salmonella Heidelberg was inhibited 11% (1.1 × 105 CFU/ml) and 84% (8.4 × 105 CFU/ml) respectively by the two fluences. Complete inactivation of each Salmonella strain was achieved using 165 or 220 J/cm2 .

CONCLUSION

The observed inhibition of Gram-positive (MRSA) and Gram-negative (Salmonella) bacteria suggests the versatility of blue light in bacteria eradication, making it a viable intervention strategy for decontamination of food and environments that harbor such bacteria. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:595-601, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Bumah VV

Masson-Meyers DS

Enwemeka CS

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Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26174877